Gypsum

Gypsum

GYPSUM ROCK
GYPSUM POWDER

Gypsum is a soft sulfate mineral composed of calcium sulfate dihydrate, with the chemical formula CaSO4·2H2O. It is widely mined and is used as a fertilizer and as the main constituent in many forms of plaster, blackboard/sidewalk chalk, and drywall. Gypsum also crystallizes as translucent crystals of selenite. It forms as an evaporite mineral and as a hydration product of anhydrite.

Gypsum is a common mineral, with thick and extensive evaporite beds in association with sedimentary rocks. Gypsum is deposited from lake and sea water, as well as in hot springs, from volcanic vapors, and sulfate solutions in veins. Gypsum is the most common sulfate mineral.

Pure gypsum is white, but other substances found as impurities may give a wide range of colors to local deposits. Because gypsum dissolves over time in water, gypsum is rarely found in the form of sand. 


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